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DVI Cables

Digital Visual Interface (DVI) is a video display interface used to connect a video source to a display device, such as a computer monitor. It was developed with the intention of creating an industry standard for the transfer of digital video content.

The interface is designed to transmit uncompressed digital video and can be configured to support multiple modes such as DVI-D (digital only), DVI-A (analog only), or DVI-I (digital and analog). Featuring support for analog connections, the DVI specification is compatible with the VGA interface. Although DVI is predominantly associated with computers, it is sometimes used in other consumer electronics such as television sets, video game consoles and DVD players.

Digital Visual Interface (DVI) is designed to transmit uncompressed digital video and can be configured to support multiple modes such as DVI-D (digital only), DVI-A (analog only), or DVI-I (digital and analog). Featuring support for analog connections, the DVI specification is compatible with the VGA interface. Although DVI is predominantly associated with computers, it is sometimes used in other consumer electronics such as television sets, video game consoles and DVD players.

The maximum length recommended for DVI cables is not included in the specification, since it is dependent on the pixel clock frequency. In general, cable lengths up to 15 feet (4.6 m) will work for display resolutions up to 1920 × 1200. Longer cables up to 50 feet (15 m) in length can be used with display resolutions 1280 × 1024 or lower. For greater distances, the use of a DVI booster – a signal repeater which may use an external power supply – is recommended to help mitigate signal degradation.

The DVI connector on a device is given one of three names, depending on which signals it implements: DVI-D (digital only, single link or dual link), DVI-A (analog only), DVI-I (integrated, combines digital and analog in the same connector; digital may be single or dual link).

Most DVI connector types – the exception being DVI-A – contain pins that pass digital video signals. These come in two varieties: single link and dual link. Single-link DVI employs a single 165 MHz transmitter that supports resolutions up to 1920 × 1200 at 60 Hz. Dual-link DVI adds six additional pins (located in the center of the connector) for a second transmitter increasing the bandwidth and supporting resolutions up to 2560 × 1600 at 60 Hz. A connector with these additional pins is sometimes referred to as DVI-DL (dual link). Dual link should not be confused with dual display (also known as dual head), which is a configuration consisting of a single computer connected to two monitors, usually utilizing a DMS-59 connector.

In addition to digital, some DVI connectors also have pins that pass an analog signal, which can be used to connect an analog monitor. The analog pins are the four that surround the flat blade on a DVI-I or DVI-A connector. A VGA monitor, for example, can be connected to a video source with DVI-I through the use of a passive adapter. Since the analog pins are directly compatible with VGA signaling, passive adapters are simple and cheap to produce, providing a cost-effective solution to support VGA on DVI. The long flat pin on a DVI-I connector is wider than the same pin on a DVI-D connector, so even if the four analog pins were manually removed, it still wouldn't be possible to connect a male DVI-I to a female DVI-D. It is possible, however, to join a male DVI-D connector with a female DVI-I connector.

Some DVD players, HDTV sets, and video projectors have DVI connectors that transmit an encrypted signal for copy protection using the High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) protocol. Computers can be connected to HDTV sets over DVI, but the graphics card must support HDCP to play content protected by digital rights management (DRM).




Showing 1-30 of 230 items
Showing 1-30 of 230 items